ISO 11611:2015 Protective clothing for use in welding and allied processes

This guide deals with protective clothing that should be worn by all workers and employers who use welding processes or related techniques, regularly or occasionally. The techniques related are operations that present risks similar to those of welding, such as oxycutting, flame or arc gouging, and thermal spraying.

The choice of these protective equipment must also take consideration of work processes and situations. The ISO 11611: 2015 standard is built on two classes of exposure, depending of the hazards risk. These classes determine the needs for protection depending of the exposures from hazards, such as, the volume of: sparks; molten metal ; radiant heat that worker are exposed during the tasks.

Class 1 protective clothing

Suitable for welding techniques and work situations that cause small amounts of sparks and droplets of molten metal and low radiant heat.

Class 2 protective clothing

Resist more sparks and droplets of molten metal. They offer greater protection against radiant heat.

To ensure that the garment conforms to the standard, BIGBILL ensures, among other things, that:

• all tests required by the standard are made as prescribed. Where the tests are carried out by a subcontractor of the certification body, that subcontractor must have demonstrated his competence and performance in carrying out those tests;

 

• the performance criteria of each test are respected;

 

• the design and manufacturing requirements of the standard are met; (See down there)

 

• the manufacturer’s labels and instructions give all the information required by the standard; (See down there)

 

• The manufacturer maintains a quality system that ensures consistency and conformity of the product on an ongoing basis.

The label:

The ISO 11611: 2015 standard requires that protective clothing has one or more labels that provide, in a visible and durable manner, essential information on their origin, their

features and cleaning instructions. Mark the following label on your protective suit:

Fabrics and materials:

The fabrics and materials that make up the protective clothing are ISO 11611 certified and guarantee resistance to flame propagation, do not produce inflamed or melted debris, and residual incandescence and flame persistence times do not exceed 2 seconds. They resist the heat of molten metal splashes and offer a barrier against radiant heat. The molten metal does not adhere to the materials.

The design of the protective clothing:

Here is the design element of the protective suit

1) The neck is protected by a mandarin collar with closure

2) The closures are covered with a protective rabbat

3) Les poches sont munie de rabbat plus large que l’ouverture

4) The side pockets form an angle of not more than 10 °

5) The coverall has side slots, which are provided with a closure means.

6) The sleeve is provided with a closure to reduce its width. The closure and folds are then under the wrist.

More:
All snap closures are covered with fabric by the inside and the outside.

Related Products - Class 2

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Learn more about NFPA 70e and Arc Flash

CHANGES TO OSHA 1910.269 EFFECT PPE FOR THE CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS

Modifications have been made to OSHA 1910.269 that effect the construction standards for work on electric power generation, transmission and distribution installations, and for electrical protective equipment (utilities). This federally enforceable law will now require FR protective apparel.

OSHA 1910.269

• July 15, 2014

Workers shall be in flame resistant clothing, no citations will be issued.

• October 31, 2014

Head to toe flame resistant clothing becomes enforceable, citations will be issued.

• January 1, 2015

By this date employers need to have made reasonable estimates of incident energy (Hazard Risk Assessment).

• April 31, 2015

By this date the outer layer of clothing worn by

workers must be flame-resistant when the estimated

incident heat energy exceeds 2.0 cal/cm2 (could be from other sources other than electric arc). By this time each worker exposed to hazards from electric arcs should be wearing the required arc-rated protective equipment.

OSHA 1910.269 SUMMARY :

• No Judgment calls can be made

• Work Place must be evaluated for Arc-Flash Hazards

• Must Calculate incident energy

• If >2 cal/cm2 employers must provide FR clothing

• Employers must provide Equivalent Arc-Rated Clothing

• All Outer Layer must be FR

• 100% body coverall is now required

All jobs applications that require the employer provide FR clothing:

• Near Flammable Materials

• >600 Volts

• Potential for Molten Metal Splatter

WHAT IS NFPA 70E?

NFPA 70E is the Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, established by the National Fire Protection Agency. It applies to all electrical & maintenance workers who are working on or near energized equipment. To ensure the best safety practices are taken place, the standard is updated every 3 years, the next update will be active in 2015. The changes are made in hopes of simplifying and clarifying the standard.

4 MAJOR CHANGES TO THE 2015 EDITION OF NFPA 70E:

• New Arc Flash PPE (Personal Protection Equipement) Categories [Section 130.7(C)(15)]

The current table provided for Personal Protection Equipment guidance refers to “HRC” (Hazard Risk Category), this title has been revised and changed to the term PPE Category. This table has endured a series of formatting changes, the major being it has been split into 2 tables to address. Table 1 addresses only one question “Is there a significant arc-flash risk?”. Table 2 determines arc-rated clothing and PPE.

• Eliminating HRC 0 (Section 130.7(C))

HRC 0 allowed workers who were beyond the boundary where arc-flash PPE was required to wear NON arc rated garments made from non-melting or untreated natual fibers, such as untreated cotton, wool, rayon or silk, or blends of these. It was believed in 2009 Edition that these garments provided some protection from arc flash, however after testing this was proven false. It was misleading and confusing to include HRC 0 amongst a guideline for arc-rated clothing, since HRC 0 cannot provide arc flash protection. Also, the tasks that regard HRC 0 were also removed, making it obsoleete.

• The “Prohibited Approach Boundary” has been eliminated (Section 130.4(C))

The Prohibited Approach Boundary (PAB) is the closest shock boundary line to an energized source, it does not require any actions or restrictions, which was causing a lot of confusion so it was removed. Making contact to an energized source within this boundary is considered to be the same as making contact with the eletrical circuit or circuit part. You must be a “qualified perons” to work within this boundary.

• Included wording on shirts being tucked in (130.7(C)(9)(d))

Shirt and coverall sleeves shall be rolled down and buttoned. Shirts shall be tucked into pants, and shirts, coveralls, and jackets shall be closed at the neck.

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Intro To Flame-Resistant Apparel

FR CLOTHING VS. NON FR CLOTHING

 

MOST SEVERE BURN INURIES & FATALITIES ARE CAUSED BY NON-FR CLOTHING IGNITING & COINTINUING TO BURN. 

 

A: Non-FR fabrics and apparel will ignite and burn continuously until all flammable material is consumed, even when the source is removed.
 
 
A: Flame-resistant fabrics are NOT FIRE PROOF. FR Fabrics are designed to withstand ignition, prevent flame spread, and self-extinguish when the ignition source is removed. FR fabrics do not melt onto skin, provide thermal insulation against heat & resists breaking open to expose skin. Anything that is exposed an ignition point long enough will eventaully carbonize & burn.
 
A: FR apparel does not provide significant protection from burn injury at the ignition contact area. However, flame-resistant garments do provide protection against fabric ignition and flame spread. Everything will burn when exposed to a hott source long enough, fr protective apparel provides the wearer with more time to escape from the ignition source, giving them a higher chance of survival. FR Fabrics are not designed to withstand fuel fed fires or continual burn, such as structural entry or firefighting applications.
 
A: Flame-resistant base layers, thermals, and knits can provide additional fire-resistant protection.
 
A: Flammable material on FR apparel will ignite and burn continuously on the FR garments surface. The affected garment should be immediately removed and replaced with unsoiled FR apparel. If contaminants cannot be removed by laundering, the contaminated apparel should be retired from service.
 

 

 

 

WORK PLACE HAZARDS & FR GARMENT OPTIONS

 

ALL WORK ENVIRONMENTS THAT EXPOSE YOU TO POSSIBLE IGNITION SHOULD STRONGLY CONSIDER FIRE-RESISTANT APPAREL. 

 

A:

  • HIGH HEAT
  • SPARKS
  • OPEN FLAME
  • ELECTRIC ARC
  • FLAMABLE DUST
  • MOLTEN METALS
  • FLAMABLE LIQUIDS, GASES & SOLIDS.
  • SLAG FROM FLAME CUTTING & WELDING

A:

  • Molten ferrous metal splash in steel mills & foundries
  • Protection from flash fire in the oil & gas, chemical & petrochemical, & mining industries
  • Electric arc flash protection in electric utilities & automotive industries
  • Protection against wild land fires for rescue workers
  • Protection against combustible dust in for various industries such as food, grain, tobacco, plastics, wood, paper, pulp, rubber, furniture, textiles, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, dyes, coal, metals, & fossil fuel power generation.

A:

  • Asses the workplace and employee safety needs
  • Identify potential hazards and situational risks
  • Evaluate wearer comfort, appearance, and laundering options

A:

  • It is the employers responsbility to consider the potential risks & variables, in order to choose garments based on workplace evaluation to keep there employees safe.
  • Flame-resistant fabric must provide the required degree of protection.
  • Protective apparel must be durable, yet comfortable, while maintaining an acceptable appearance to the employer and the wearer.
  • Garments must be able to be laundered to effectively remove contaminants and be returned to service without excessive surface appearance distortion or shrinkage.

 

 

 

TESTING & STANDARDS

 

A: ASTM D6413, Standard Test Method for Flame Resistance of Textiles (Vertical Method).  This text establishes a test method only, with no pass/fail requirements. The Federal Test Standard equivalent is FTS 191A Method 5903.1 (Flame Resistance of Cloth: Vertical).
 
A: In an enclosed cabinet, 12-inch long fabric specimens are vertically suspended in a holder with the fabric restrained on three sides. A controlled flame is impinged on the bottom cut edge of the fabric for 12 seconds.
 

A: Various specifications and requirements have been established based on ASTM D6413 testing; for example:

  • ASTM F2302 Standard Performance Specification for Labeling Protective Clothing as Heat and Flame-Resistant requires an Afterflame time of no more than 2.0 seconds and Char Length of less than 6.0 inches when tested in accordance with ASTM Test Method D6413 (vertical flame resistance). No melting of dripping of the specimens is allowed during the test. Also, the fabric may not ignite, melt, drip, separate or shrink more than 10% when exposed in a forced air oven at 500℉ (260℃) for 5 minutes.
  • California OSHA specifies the maximum standard measured by the ASTM F2302 for professional fire fighter’s barrack’s uniforms.
  • In the absence of other requirements, BIG BILL FR® follows ASTM F2302 as a minimum requirement. Other performance requirements may apply to specific garments and will be noted on the garment label. ( Not sure if you want to add this specification, but The Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB) and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) require a maximum of 2.0 seconds Afterflame and 4.0 inches Char Length for protection against hydrocarbon flash fires.)

 

 

 

COMPARING FABRICS, FIBERS & BLENDS

 

BIG BILL FR OFFERS GARMENTS CONSTRUCTED USING OVER 15 BRANDS OF VARIOUS MATERIALS, EACH PROVIDING VARYING LEVELS OF DURABILITY & PROTECTION, INCLUDING FINISHES GUARANTEED FOR THE LIFE OF THE GARMENT. WE STAY CURRENT WITH EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES & KEEP UP WITH THE ALWAYS EMERGING NEW FINISHES & ADDITIONAL FIBERS THAT CONTINUE TO BE DEVELOPED TO ADDRESS ANY POTENTIAL SHORTCOMINGS IN THE GLOBAL MARKET PLACE. 

 

A: Inherently flame resistant fibers and materials have flame resistance essentially constructed into the fiber. The fiber is naturally not flammable, the protection can never be worn away or washed out.Treated fibers & fabrics are made flame-resistant by the adding flame-retardant chemicals. After being treated the fabric is used to provide some level of flame retardancy. When ignited, these fabrics rely on a chemical reaction to extinguish fire. Non-durable FR Treatments are not recommend. Some flame retardant finishes for 100% cotton and cotton blend fabrics last for the life of the garment.
 
A: BLENDING, it is a method where two or more fibers are used in one fabric to balance fiber strengths and weaknesses.
 

A:

  • Thermal Protection
  • Durability
  • Stability
  • Comfort
  • Appearance
  • Color Options
  • Cost
  • Laundering Options

 

HIGH VISIBILITY FR GARMENTS

 

A:

  • ANSI/ISEA 107 American National Standard for High Visibility Safety Apparel and Headwear establishes design, material, photometric and physical performance requirements, care labeling and marking rules for high visibility apparel.
  • ANSI/ISEA 107 is the hi-vis garment standard.
  • Hi-vis apparel marked as FR must comply with at least one recognized flammability standard in its entirety, such as: ASTM F1506, ASTM F1891, ASTM F2733, or NFPA 2112.
  • FWHA requires garments meet Class 2 or 3 of ANSI/ISEA 107 apparel when working on federally aided highways. Class 2 garments provide superior visibility for high risk occupations with a complex background and/or severe weather, and where vehicle speed is usually greater than 25 mph. Class 3 garments allow the wearer to be identified as a person in high risk situations due to slight distances and/or severe weather, and high speed vehicle traffic.

 

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New FR Rain Wear! Layer Up your FR for the best industry practices.

OUTERWEAR THAT GETS THE JOB DONE ALL YEAR ROUND.

ADD & REMOVE LAYERS TO GET THE RIGHT PROTECTION & COMFORT. CUSTOMIZE YOUR UNIFORM.

Next to skin
LEVEL 1

Next to skin
LEVEL 2

Mid
Layer

Outer
Layer

Next to skin
LEVEL 1

Next to skin
LEVEL 2

Inherent FR
Uniform

Thermal &
Insulator

Shell
Protection

Best industry practices

• Dual Hazard

• Inherent Protection

• Inherent Thermoregulating Action

• High Visibility

Inherent Protection

Inherent flame resistant fabrics use fibers that have flame resistance built into their chemical/natural structures. The actual structure of the fabric itself is not flammable.

The terms “treated” and “surface treated” refer to a manufacturing process whereby a special mixture of chemicals is applied to a flam-mable fabric, such as cotton or cotton/nylon blends, to make the final fabric flame-resistant (FR) and permeable to allow some breathability.

Inherent Thermoregulating action

Polartec® FR was created to give flame resistant fabrics greater efficiency and more dependable breathing properties. Similar “chemically treated” fabrics with an added finish can only provide temporary protection because the ability fades and wears with every wash. Through a patented design, Polartec’s lightweight thermoregulating abilities allow extensive versatility for use in modern workwear designs, which naturally evaporates away moisture for the lifespan of the fabric.

High Visibility

3M™ Scotchlite™ Reflective Material is rigorously tested and meets compliance with the industry’s safety standards. Using the right 3M reflective materials for the application is the industry’s best practice, to ensure that the reflective materials will last as long as the garment does. 

Dual Hazard, Protection against Flash Fire & Arc Flashes

For a garment to be Dual hazard it needs to protect against flash fire and arc flash, meeting both the NFPA  2112 standard as well as the NFPA 70E & CSA Z462 standard. This helps to protect workers from multiple hazards and ensures the best overall protection for the worker. 

NFPA 2112, Flash Fire protection

• NFPA 2112 Standard Flame-Resistant Garments for Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Flash Fire provides the minimum requirements for the design, construction, evaluation and certification of flame-resistant garments.

• NFPA 2112 UL certification is the best industry practice. UL has become a symbol of trust in the market place as it provides peace of mind when purchasing a product.

NFPA 70E & CSA Z462 Arc Flash Protection

NFPA 70E / CSA Z462 Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace provides the minimum requirements for the design, construction, evaluation and certification of Arc-Rated garments. These standards help to ensure the industry’s best practices.

ANSI 107 - CSA Z96 High Visibility

Standards for high visibility safety apparel provide the minimum requirements for the design, construction, evaluation and certification of high-visibility garments. Using 3M Reflective material combined with ANSI 107 and CSA Z96 Class 2 and 3 the industry’s best practices.

COMFORT INSURES COMPLIANCE.

Importance of the Layering System

Currently, the industry standard for Flame-Resistant apparel does not

require you to wear FR base layers and undergarments, however wearing

these garments during an electric arc or flash fire exposure greatly decreases

your chance of body burn and significantly increases your chance of survival.

These layers provide additional valuable protection for your most important parts!

Wearing base layers also has several performance and comfort enhancing benefits, giving you peace of mind and allowing you to focus on the job. Although FR fabrics and garments have come a long way in the last decade, the extreme environmental conditions where most employees are wearing FR garments has increased the additional demand for better mobility and physical performance. Being weighed down by bulky outerwear or fabrics that do not breathe simply will not cut it. This reality leaves a lot of workers to dangerously alter their FR clothing systems; such as cutting off sleeves, or wearing ineffective lighter garments that do not meet the standards.

These dangerous alterations significantly increase the risk of injury to the

employee. Layering Systems with wicking properties are the best solution to

discomfort and mobility concerns. Layers come in many different weights and

fabrics, each is specialized for a particular environment and application. They

can keep you warm in arctic environments, handle temperature transitions and

help manage the heat in the driest environments. They allow you to quickly

add or remove layers as temperatures change. These layering systems are

customizable to your needs and provide just as much protection as it’s bulkier

counterparts. Cotton and non-FR base layers while inexpensive, have some

considerable downsides.

Importance of avoiding cotton.

Cotton and non-FR base layers while inexpensive, have some serious consequences.

You’ve heard it before. Cotton kills performance! Why is that? Because it absorbs a substantial amount of water. —up to 27 times its weight— and does not rapidly evaporate. Cotton’s limitations can lead to considerable discomfort in warm conditions and its inability to evaporate moisture that can lead to potentially life-threatening hypothermia in cold conditions.

In addition, moisture against the skin can significantly increase possible steam

burn injuries. The latest arc flash test results show that sweat is more dangerous than a hydraulic fluid soaked garment.

Risks of Non-FR fabric & base layers:

  • Melts onto skin and and will continue to burn
  • Cotton against the skin absorbs moisture and holds it, which rapidly wicks away a workers body heat in winter and increases discomfort in summer, leaving them vulnerable to hypothermia and potential steam burns
  • Increases percentage of burn injury
  • Greatly decreases chances of survival

BIG BILL Layering Systems features the Industry’s Best Practices

  • Increases mobility
  • Inherent wicking action
  • Inherent protection
  • Highly breathable and quick drying
  • Comfortable next-to-skin
  • Hypoallergenic
  • All Weather proof
  • Inherent High Visibility
  • Peace of mind, assurance of compliance
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Patented Flashtrap® Flame Blocking Vented Traps for a safer, and more comfortable coverall.

Flashtrap® Vented Coverall

The BIG BILL® FLASHTRAP Vented Coverall is the latest development to improve wearer comfort without sacrificing protection for both Flash Fire & Arc Flash exposures. Below are the three primary Patent Pending features of Big Bill’s FlashTrap:

1) Back Knee Vented Traps
Located on the back of both knees, this technology allows cooler air into the coverall, pushing warmer air up through the upper back and out the sideways air vents. The traps are constructed of a double layered folded fabric that prevents your skin exposed, creating more protection. 

2) Upper & Lower Back Vented Traps
Located along both sides at the back, these vents allow the hot air, which circulates upwards, to be pushed outward, exiting the coverall, keeping you cool. The traps are constructed of a double layered fabric that does not leave your skin exposed, creating more protection.

3) Features PATENTED Specially Designed Vented Traps Made of FR Mesh

The Vented Traps that are located along the back and behind both knees are specially designed in a manner that does NOT expose your skin, keeping you protected from arc flash or flash fire exposure. No debris can enter the coverall. The fashion in which the vented traps are constructed includes a double layer of fabric, folded to create the vented trap, increasing the protection, making a safer coverall. The FR Mesh located between the folded double layer of fabric allows cool air to circulate into your coverall, pushing out hot air, creating a ventilation system.   

  • REDUCES BURN INJURY
  • INCREASES RATE OF SURVIVAL
  • A PATENTED TECHNOLOGY
  • FLASH FIRE & ARC FLASH PROTECTION

Flashtrap® Coveralls

Flashtrap® Shirts

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The only Cat Skiing experience of the East Coast

Murdochville is a little town right in the middle of the Chic-Chocs mountains in the region of Gaspesie, Quebec. Winter in Murdochville means one thing: an annual snowfall average of 7 meters. The snow is considered mostly dry, and the skiing conditions are well known to be nothing but great. BIG BILL is proud of his association with the Chic-Chac and highly recommend anyone to discover this jem of four season outdoor activities. 

 

For more info: https://www.chic-chac.ca/en/home/ 

 

Follow the Chic-Chac on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chicchac.ca/

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NFPA 2112 Compliant

NFPA 2112-2012, “STANDARD ON FLAME-RESISTANT GARMENTS FOR PROTECTION OF INDUSTRIAL PERSONNEL AGAINST FLASH FIRE”

 

 

The NFPA 2112 standard specifies the minimum performance requirements and test methods for FR fabrics and components, and the design and certification requirements for garments developed to protect workers from flash fire hazards. It requires FR fabrics to pass a comprehensive series of thermal tests, including the following standards: 

 

ASTM D6413 – Vertical Flammability test: Fabric must with stand a maximum of 2 seconds after flame and have less than 4-inch char length.

 

ASTM F2700 – Heat Transfer Performance (HTP) test: Fabric must have a minimum HTP of 6 cal/cm2 with a spacer and 3 cal/cmwhen in contact with the heat source.

 

Thermal Stability test: Fabric must not melt or drip, separate or ignite after five minutes in an oven at 500 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

Thermal Shrinkage test: Fabric must not shrink more than 10 percent after five minutes in an oven at 500 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

ASTM F1930-11 – Thermal Mannequin test: Fabric must not allow have more than a maximum of 50-percent predicted body burn after a

three-second thermal exposure.

 

Important

In order of using our NFPA 2112 protective apparel properly, please read carefully our User Information

Click on this link below to see all the NFPA 2112 Products

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